How AI Can Revolutionize Cars

Just like many other industries, artificial intelligence is making a huge change in the way we look at cars. Not just in the private sector, but also as a newly-emerging competitor for taxi and delivery services, especially when it comes to self-driving autonomous vehicles. Contrary to popular belief, the definition of an autonomous car really falls within a spectrum of definitions, depending on the level of machine/human collaboration. At its most basic, there is automation for driver assistance. This is when a system merely assists the driver’s motions but does not control anything itself. An example of driving assistance would be parking sensors. At the more advanced levels, the car and the human would each take turns controlling the car. This is something that used to feel like science fiction but is now a reality.

Self-driving cars increase the amount of power given to an artificially intelligent system, as opposed to relying solely on a human component. Sensors are a big part of the equation when it comes to self-driving cars. The system gets most of its input from real-world data that is being rapidly accumulated from hundreds of sensors located all over the vehicle. In today’s day and age, there are different levels of data input and control. Looking at highly automated and fully automated, the key difference is that humans still run a highly automated system and they choose to hand over temporary control. A fully automated system, however, is one that is making the machine the primary user. The vehicle is solely system-based. A human’s presence is still needed, but they do not interfere with any functions. A completely automated car is one that requires no assistance whatsoever from a driver as it navigates from point A to point B. When people refer to a robocar, the vehicle has enough sensors to make decisions based on its environment in order to deliver passengers safely to their destination. 

In addition to removing the worry of control, AI is seeking to appeal to generations that no longer want the burden of ownership, either. Many millennials choose shared economies and the newer pay-to-play services such as streaming over DVD rentals, rideshares over car rentals, and city bikes over buying their own. Likewise, the concept of private automobile ownership will seem archaic within the next two decades.